Birds in Winter

pigeon on house

How do you think birds survive in winter?  Where do they find food?

Well, if they’re birds in Australia, then there’s no reason to worry about them.  The climate there is good and it’s always easy for them to find something to eat.

But, what about in a country that is covered by snow and ice for 3-6 months every year?

Where do birds find food in winter in Moscow?

Well, Russia is a place where very kind and thoughtful people live.  Birds here don’t have to go far to find their next meal.

It’s right here:

Bird feeder 1

That’s right – there are bird feeders everywhere!

Some of them are permanent, in places like parks, and are put there by the park administration.

Bird feeder 2

And then there’s this permanent one not far from our home which is next to the footpath.  It’s a housing complex for birds!

Bird feeder 3
Bird feeder 4

And then you have the not so permanent ones.  I don’t know who puts them in the trees; I’ve never seen anyone doing it.  But sometimes you go outside and there’s a bird feeder which wasn’t there the day before.

These ones are more temporary, but they are just as popular as the others.

bird feeder 8
bird feeder 9

This one could easily go in my post about Patriotism.

bird feeder 10

People often fill them with bread or seeds which the birds need to stay alive during the winter (although you can see bird feeders all year round).

You can see that some of the bird feeders are only accessible by a very small hole, so only the tiniest birds can get in.

bird feeder 6
bird feeder 7

Pigeons

I guess that means that the pigeons have to go elsewhere for dinner.  Like to the centre of Moscow, Tverskaya Street to be exact, where this old woman is feeding them.

old woman feeding birds

Unlike in Australia, where feeding pigeons is frowned upon because they’re seen as pests, here in Moscow the pigeons don’t miss out on a free meal.

There are people everywhere who throw bread and seeds on the ground in various places to ensure that the birds don’t starve.

And sometimes the pigeons help themselves to the more accessible bird feeders for a snack.  It looks like this pigeon has claimed this one as his own.

pigeon on house

So, there’s no need to worry about the birds in Moscow this winter, or anytime actually, because the local people take good care of them.

bird feeder 11
bird feeder 12
bird feeder 12

What do you think about people feeding wild birds?  Should we leave nature to sort itself out without our intervention?  How do you feel about pigeons, are they pests?

Bird feeders in Moscow
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Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

Enjoy the rest of your week!

~ Cheryl

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Author: Cheryl

I'm an Australian woman who is now living in a village in rural Bulgaria. I lived for 12 years in Moscow, Russian Federation, working as an English language teacher. My current loves are my husband and my vegetable garden.

2 thoughts on “Birds in Winter”

  1. Cheryl, This is a fabulous post. I enjoyed the photos and descriptions on how kind people are where you live in Moscow and even created hand-made bird houses to feed the birds. Those hand-made bird houses would make a great DIY. Joyce

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    1. Hello Joyce! Yes, it’s so nice to see these while out walking. And there are always new ones popping up around the place. I like that there are also ‘official’ ones, more permanent and put there by the parks administration. It really is wonderful to see people taking care of animals, even in a city as big as Moscow. Small things count, don’t they? Thank you for visiting and commenting. Have a lovely weekend. 🙂

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